Archive for the ‘In the news’ Category

Club Buffet Dinner

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

Gentlemen:

George McCaughey has once again most graciously made notice for our members that there will be a “Club Buffet Dinner” at Riverside Golf  and Country Club on “Wednesday April 30th 2014” … cost is $30.00 per person (tax and gratuity included)

This is the 3rd club dinner George has arranged for us, the others were wonderful and the meal is spectacular at a very modest cost … So let’s “grab our spouses” and head on out to the Country Club for dinner on the 30th of April … We arrange the tables that we are all together aiding great conversation, fellowship and just a grand ole time …

Drop me a note or call to let me know you will be there, we should have no trouble at all gathering together 12 couples (hopefully more)…

Yours Aye

John

657-3760

sjwatson@nbnet.nb.ca

Rugby Shirts

Monday, March 24th, 2014

There has been some interest among a few members feeling we should consider looking into purchasing rugby shirts with our logo emblazoned on to them … Some preliminary inquiries have been made already and good quality shirts with our logo and your name (if you wish) can be had for an approximate cost of $70.00 …

 

The reason for this note is simply to determine the interest level of this idea … If there is enough interest to move forward with this, the group would determine style, colour, markings etc.

 

I really believe this is a good idea, we’ve got a good thing going with this “Grand ole Society” most of us are not getting any younger and a little fun and fellowship with great folks of similar interests is not a bad thing. Many of us took part the other night in a reception at “Pete’s Pub” for the Scottish Women’s Curling Team that were in our town competing at the Ford World Women’s Curling Tournament and all the folks I’ve spoken with have had nothing but rave reviews of that event, and the team along with their families were noticeably thrilled to death, this will surely be a fond memory for them for many years, and it was wonderful thing we did and it made me feel real good that we did this for these folks I’m, so pleased with our Society just now and believe there is so much more to do, simply put forth an idea

 

Back to the Rugby shirts, which looks absolutely great worn with a kilt (you would look good wearing your kilt, rugby shirt and casual footwear, I can see you now strutting your stuff!!! ) … Let’s get some interest in this project and hopefully we get it  underway, we’ll do nothing till we’ve heard back from you folks, so simply let me know, and I’ll keep you posted on the progress …

 

Yours aye

John

657-3760

333-7684

sjwatson@nbnet.nb.ca

Tuesday, November 19th, 2013

sassj-seal

Saint Andrew’s Society

Of

Saint John

(Founded in the Province of New Brunswick, CANADA – 1798 A.D.)

2013 Annual Society Church Parade

Sunday November 24, 2013

Grace Presbyterian Church

101 Coburg St.

Saint John

(Formerly Church of St. John and St. Stephen)

Service starts at 11:00 hrs.

Please attend by 10:30hrs. For formation

Saint Andrews Society of Saint John history..

Monday, March 25th, 2013

The Society history is now available in hard cover at a cost of $38.00.

Sales have been brisk this week.

Members can get a copy by contacting either Laurie Hossack or John Watson via email and we will deliver the book or arrange for delivery.

The payment should be made by cheque to the Saint John St. Andrew’s Society.

Contact Laurie at 847-4420 or John at 657-3760.

Heritage Fair 2013

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013

“Heritage Fair 2013”

Market Square Atrium, Market Square

Saturday March 23 rd 2013 … 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Looking for Volunteers Probably (8 – 10) Society members to help collect, setup and man a table (3’ x 6’) displaying some of our tartans / regalia, books etc.

During the Fair

Highland wear would be appropriate but not essential (if not available to you) … A piper would also be nice to have on site

Please contact me ASAP if you might be interested that we may draft up a plan for our display

Contact … John Watson

657-3760

333-7684

sjwatson@nbnet.nb.ca

“MIGHT” Be Of Interest???!!!!

Monday, October 15th, 2012
Welcome to “Scotch Whisky Uncovered 4” – the fourth in a regular series of scotch whisky “facts & tips” e-mails initiated in response to the significant demand for ongoing scotch whisky information that I have received via the websites www.scotchwhisky.net andwww.scotchwhiskyresources.com

The last “Scotch Whisky Uncovered” e-mail which covered the main types of scotch whisky which we categorised as “Single Malt,” “Grain,” “Blended” and “Blended Malt” prompted the following questions from readers;

  • “I now understand the main categories, but where do “cask strength whiskies” fit in?”
  • “I have a bottle which states “Cask Strength, No chill filtering & no colouring” – what does this mean?”
  • “What about the regional categories?”

I plan to cover the “Cask Strength/Chill filtering” questions below and detail the Scotch Whisky regions in the next e-mail – “Scotch Whisky Uncovered 5”

“Scotch Whisky Uncovered” #4 – What is “cask strength and chill filtering

“Cask strength” whiskies are whiskies which are bottled straight from the cask at the alcohol strength at which the spirit has naturally arrived following the maturation process – with no water added to dilute the strength. An above value of 50 to 55% would be a typical cask strength, but natural cask strength could be anything from 40% to over 60% depending on the whisky, cask type, maturation conditions and age.

What is “chill filtering”? As noted in an earlier edition of “Uncovered” when we reviewed the legal definition, the matured spirit has to have a minimum alcohol strength of 40% to be officially designated as “scotch whisky.” Many scotch whiskies are produced at this strength – or sometimes 43% – with water being added to the distilled and matured whisky to achieve the desired strength. However, as water is added to matured whisky straight from the cask, as the alcohol strength drops below 46%abv, the spirit goes “cloudy” as some elements of the whisky such as natural fats go into suspension. This feature is not a problem in terms of taste, but it is undesirable visually as consumers may assume that a problem exists with the spirit. To address this problem, these elements are removed by a “chill filtering” process. The process involves chilling the spirit to a low temperature, running the spirit through a filter to remove the fats which have come out of solution and then allowing the spirit to come back to ambient temperature at which point it will be perfectly clear.

Many whisky buffs/connoisseurs prefer whiskies which state “no chill filtering” on the label as they believe that they are sampling the whisky in its fully natural state. (One comparison often cited is “full” milk versus “semi-skimmed” milk but this is perhaps a bit unfair on the many excellent chill-filtered whiskies!).

Single cask whiskies – and many of the whiskies produced by independent bottlers in particular – emphasise their individuality by promoting the “non chill filtered” and “no additional colouring” features of their products. Single cask whiskies can emphasise the differences in colour that can be produced from whiskies matured in different casks. The large volume scotch whisky producers have to ensure that the flavour and colour profile of their whiskies are consistent from batch to batch and year to year. For this reason, the higher volume producers often add a small amount of colouring to their product. The colouring which is added must be simple caramel colouring.

The above information is extracted from 100 facts to be found in Chapter 1 of our electronic guide ““The Essential Guide to Scotch Whisky.”” For more information on the guide please click here.

Please look out for the next edition of “Scotch Whisky Uncovered” facts and tips.

(Please note that if you do not wish to receive any future correspondence from us, please click on the “Manage Your Subscription” link below.)

Thanks for your interest and “Slainte!”

Alan Gordon

www.scotchwhisky.net

eenquiries@scotchwhisky.net | w:www.scotchwhiskyresources.com

International Young Scotland Program 2013 – Invitation for the St. Andrew’s Society of Saint John to participate

Monday, October 15th, 2012

By way of introduction, I’m a Glasgow-born Scot now living in Connecticut and I am the Patron of a Scottish charity called the Institute of Contemporary Scotland (ICS). One of our signature activities is that we run the annual Young Scotland Program which is aimed at stimulating debate and broadening the mind of young professionals (18-32) in Scotland. We have been successfully running it for 10 years within Scotland (and latterly Ireland), but to celebrate the 10th anniversary we want to try and run an international program next June that taps into the Scottish diaspora a little and brings a group of young professionals with international connections to Scotland for 4 days of debate and personal development. The intent is to have 20 international delegates with Scottish connections hosted by 10 participants from Scotland, the majority of whom will have participated in the program before.

Our hope is that Scottish heritage organizations around the world like St. Andrew’s and Caledonian Societies will act as nominating bodies. The proposition is that ICS will foot the bill for running the program (including food and board) and we would ask the Scottish societies around the world to both identify candidates and also cover travel expenses to Scotland. The St. Andrews Society in New York has already committed to sending 1or 2 delegates and we are starting the broader outreach effort with the intent of having the program’s 20 places filled by early next year.

I have attached the marketing brochure that we have put together. This is also a link to the Young Scotland Program website. www.youngprogramme.org. The financial cost to the Society of sending a delegate would be a return flight to Edinburgh for each participant you sponsor (possibly funded by your members donating frequent flyer miles). More important to me is the participation of leading Scottish cultural organizations to help nominate suitable participants. I hope this is something that your organization is willing to consider. With the upcoming referendum in 2014 on Scottish independence, I think this is a great opportunity to strengthen Scottish-Canadian links in the next generation and expose them to the breadth of debate happening within Scotland at the moment.

Please let me know if you would like a phone call to discuss the program. I hope you will consider participating and nominating a delegate for what I am sure will be an exceptional experience.

Regards

Alan McIntyre

COO and Managing Partner North America

Oliver Wyman

1166 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY

W: 212-541-8100

M: 203-326-0992

IYSP 2013

Fall Concerts

Monday, October 15th, 2012

La Tour Baroque Duo

Tim Blackmore, recorders & harpsichord

Michel Cardin, theorbo

Sunday, October 14, 2 PM  St Anne’s Chapel, 245 Westmorland St., Fredericton

Wednesday, October 17, 7 PM  Salle Neil-Michaud, Université de Moncton

Sunday, October 21, 2 PM  Hughes Hall, 228 Germaine St., Saint John

Admission: $20 Adults  $15 Seniors  $5 Students

Information: 634-8442   www.earlymusicstudio.ca

 

 

Early Music Studio of Saint John Inc.

www.earlymusicstudio.ca

506-634-8442

Flodden Field: 500 Years Commemoration at Ford Castle

Monday, October 8th, 2012
Flodden Field: 500 Years Commemoration at Ford Castle We are writing to enquire whether any members of your group would be interested in staying at Ford Castle to attend the commemoration of the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Flodden.
This took place at Flodden Field near the village of Branxton on the Scottish-English border on September 9th 1513. Scottish King James IV led his troops against the forces of King Henry VIII, led by the Earl of Surrey and after 3 hours of extremely bloody combat, 14,000 men lay dead. This was the last time a King of Scots led a united Scots army into battle and the result had a significant influence on the future of Scotland.
King James captured Ford Castle on September 1st and he spent the days before the battle in residence there. It was rumoured that he had ‘assignations’ with Elizabeth, Lady Heron with a ‘secret staircase’ linking their rooms. He slept in the ‘King James Room’ before losing his life on the battlefield along with many brave men on both sides. The battle secured Henry’s position on his northern border but left Scotland questioning the wisdom of the ‘Auld Alliance’ with France. In part it contributed to the ‘Union of the Crowns’ of Scotland and England under James VI of Scotland in 1603. The site of the battle is marked by a granite cross on the summit of Pipers Hill and engraved with the words ‘To the brave of both nations’. Ford Castle stands to this day although with a number of Victorian changes.
The King James room and ‘secret staircase’ however remain unchanged. The castle is now a residential centre for educational holidays for groups of young students who also take part in a range of challenging activities. They are all inspired by staying in this fantastic, historic building as indeed would any visiting group.
We believe that the Castle should play a major role in the Flodden 500 commemorations by providing a very special visit for our guests. It is planned to use the Great Hall to stage a number of illustrated lectures by experts on the battle itself and the events leading to and following on from this bloody encounter. We will be holding an ‘eve of battle’ commemoration dinner on the night of September 8th and a guided walk along ‘The Battlefield Trail’ on September 9th, the anniversary date.
There will also be several organised excursions with expert guides to local areas of historical interest including the majestic city of Edinburgh. We are able to offer a special Flodden package for interested groups for the week of Saturday, September 7th – Saturday, September 14th 2013. The package will include full board accommodation at the castle, a guided tour of the Castle and the battlefield, several excursions including Edinburgh, plus guest lectures. There will be a magnificent commemorative dinner, with all beverages included throughout the stay. The package will also include transfers to and from Edinburgh airport. If your group would prefer other excursions and/or presentations these can be discussed and incorporated into an itinerary tailored to your requirements. If you are interested in taking advantage of this historic opportunity could you please let us know as soon as possible as places are limited. The cost of the package will be dependent on the group size and exact requirements and will be discussed and agreed with groups on receiving an expression of interest. We look forward to hearing from you.
Yours truly, Ben Wire
PS Photos of the Castle can be seen on our website at: www.ford-castle.co.uk

“ To all of Scottish blood I bring, the message, Fear God , Honour King.”

Monday, June 4th, 2012

MAY 21, 2012, Saint John, N.B.—Thousands gathered to see the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall arrive in Saint John, home of Canada’s oldest Saint Andrew’s Society founded in 1798.  As the royal couple arrived at Saint Andrew’s Square on a bright and sunny Victoria Day before their walkabout, they were greeted by the Premiere of New Brunswick David Alward, Mayor Ivan Court and many others.

Their Royal Highnesses were escorted to a waiting table covered with the City of Saint John Tartan to be seated and sign the city’s guest book.  His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales was not seated in just any chair however, he was seated in the Preses’ Chair.

In the summer of 1907 famous N.B. woodcarver John Rogerson was sent to Scotland to gather rare and historic pieces of oak and holly to carve a chair for the Saint Andrew’s Society president to enjoy at the Society’s functions.  This chair was presented to the Society in March of 1908 on the occasion of its 110th anniversary.  The chair I still in use today at dinners and was offered for use in the Square that bears the Society’s name.

There are 26 different pieces of wood from 6 different regions in Scotland, including some 800 year old black oak from the castle site where Robert the Bruce was born which forms the scroll work and celtic knot work surrounding the back panel.  It also has a small piece of holly tree that was cut down from Robert Burns original grave site in the St. Michaels churchyard.  That small holly tree was cut into 3 pieces, 2 remain in Scotland as gavels at Freemason lodges and the 3rd was given to John Rogerson and he used it to carve the Lion Rampant in the Bruce Shield at the top of the chair.

John Rogerson has work scattered all over the City of Saint John, including one of his ships’ figureheads at the N.B. Museum.  His work is very collectable.  He always considered this chair one of his finest works.

David Nickerson, current president of the Society, stood nearby and was honoured to meet their Royal Highnesses,  The Prince enjoyed the chair and the Duchess remarked on his sporran and wondered if the weather was always so nice in Saint John.  As they wandered down Prince William St. on their walkabout, David Nickerson aided by young Harrison Hossack grandson to the incoming president and many of the Society members returned the Preses’ chair to safety after its brief outing.

It should be noted that although Charles the Prince of Wales is not yet King he may well be in line for the job and the Society felt it only fitting that the future King have a proper N.B. treasure to sit in.  In fact inscribed on the back of the chair above the names of those members who sponsored John’s trip in 1907 is a poem containing the line  “  To all of Scottish blood I bring, the message, Fear God , Honour King.”


For any further information on the Society or our Preses’ chair , please contact, David Nickerson, 506-847-9343, 506-647-9343